How to craft a killer personal brand statement

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It’s the elevator pitch that tells recruiters and networkers what you’ve got to offer in a handy nutshell. Here’s how to get it right… 

In a world that’s overflowing with information, it pays to make yourself memorable. Your personal brand statement helps to do just that. 

This essential self-marketing tool is basically a pithy statement of your key skills and the value you can bring to any organisation you’re hoping to work for. For example:

  • Industry-accredited software developer with 7 years’ experience developing apps and tools for award-winning fintech enterprises 
  • ACCA-qualified accountant specialising in creative SMEs, who really enjoys using her professional skills to support the entrepreneurial culture of start-ups and smaller companies 

Think of your personal brand statement as an elevator pitch for who you are and what you’ve got to offer. It’s ideal if you want to grab the attention of a hiring manager or recruiter sifting through CVs, or simply have a strong one-liner ready when your Skype interviewer says, ‘So tell me about yourself…’

How to craft a mission statement 

Mission statements tend to follow a formula. Typically it goes:

  • ‘[I am] an X with Y looking to do Z’ 

X sums up what you do, ideally with some sort of credential or proof point attached e.g. ‘industry-accredited’ or ‘highly experienced’ or ‘bilingual’. 

Y relates to your experience and the sort of value you offer e.g. ‘with 5 years’ experience in negotiating merger & acquisition deals in the retail sector’. 

Z is what you’re looking for next, again ideally also framed as a benefit to your potential audience e.g ‘looking to translate my proven business development skills into effective fundraising initiatives in the non-profit sector’. 

Read our related articles on winning the dream job with your personal brand statement:

Top tips for a personal brand statement that will stand out

How to use your personal brand statement effectively to differentiate yourselves

 

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